Thread: combines

  1. #1
    lONGFEllOW
    Guest
    WHAT TYPE OF INFORMATION DO YOU NEEDIJIJIJIJ

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  3. #2
    lONGFEllOW
    Guest
    I've seen a lot of combine "drivers" try to go fast to put on a show. lets "operate" the combine. lets do a good job, put the crop in the grain tank, not on the ground for next years seed. I have seen all colors going too fast because the operator doesn't know how to adjust it. I have seen lots of operators drive slower than they have to because that is how they have always done it. Your question is pretty broad. I have seen them go 18 MPH on the road. Yes on the road. Some farmers will road an 8 row head and 20 foot platform. Or did you mean in the fieldIJIJ I've been in 9500's at 6 mph and better. Now what kind of corn are you talkingIJIJ 100 bushel...200 bushelIJIJ like I said this is a pretty broad question.

  4. #3
    JOHNAH
    Guest
    VERY EXPENSIVE!!

  5. #4
    Jim
    Guest
    If you don't compare the actual price ( not coffee

  6. #5
    dingo
    Guest
    Well Johnny I can understand how longfellow was trying to be a bit smart with his comment but I'll try and help you out.

  7. #6
    farm_boy
    Guest
    the 480 cat against a 9610 or a 2388 is no contest. the cat will smoke and I mean SMOKE both of them machines on their best day. Even a 460 will walk the case or the deere 9610. Believe me if anybody tells you different they need to actually get there head out of the sand and look at them side by side. As far as price, talked to a farmer today that got a trade price trading in his 2388 on a cat and his words were" they wernt as bad as everyone says"

  8. #7
    skinnyfarmer
    Guest
    The price difference between a 93 and 94 would most likely depend on the seperator hours. About the only difference in the machine is that a 94 model has a three stage throttle, instead of two stage.

  9. #8
    homer
    Guest
    Both the '93 and '94 9600 has a 3 stage throttle. I believe that update was done in '91.

  10. #9
    JD_Tech
    Guest
    In regards to the capacity of a 9650 STS compared to a 9600.

  11. #10
    JR
    Guest
    I have had 2 of them for 21 years cutting rice and soybeans.Overall I have spent very little money on them,great machines.I am thinking about selling and going to 1 jd 9600, but hate to spend the money with the uncertainty of our new farm program.

  12. #11
    JR
    Guest
    I have had 2 of them for 21 years cutting rice and soybeans.Overall I have spent very little money on them,great machines.I am thinking about selling and going to 1 jd 9600, but hate to spend the money with the uncertainty of our new farm program.

  13. #12
    Green_Envy
    Guest
    I heard that John Deere sold about 200 combines in Russia awhile back. Have you seen operated them or seen them. Just curious.

  14. #13
    Silver_Bullet
    Guest
    It all depends on how much you have to harvest and how much you want to spend I had an R50 and it was a decent machine with good capacity. The narrow feeder house probably gave me the most problems. With some modifications to update to a floor similar to what the 52's have, that took care of most of my problems. I think if you could get into a 62...even an early model one, you would be happier. Their built much better and the machine is a lot more forgiving in tough or high yield conditions. I would also try to stay away from the N series and the R60's-70's...quite a few more moving parts on them compared to an R-2series. The R50 was built much like the 2 series so your ok there. The cab is nicer on the 2 series also.

  15. #14
    dennis
    Guest
    thanks for the insight i live in the shenandoah valley and don't do much over 100 acres so that is why we were looking at the r50.what can you tell me about the r40 found one of them for not much money.

  16. #15
    Silver_Bullet
    Guest
    You'll get along fine with either an R40 or 50. The two are basically the same machine. The R40 had a little less horsepower (R40-155hp, R50 190hp) and I know the 40 did not have the bin extension that the 50 had. The R50 had 200 bushel bin capacity and the R40, I believe, had around 150-160. Not a significant difference for what your wanting to do. I would say it would just come down to the condition of the machine. Generally, you get what you pay for.

  17. #16
    Trit
    Guest
    R40, if in good shape, will be a very nice machine for you. We do a little under 200 acres. 150 bushels is a FUll bin, usually a little less than that. Fabricate some sideboards, turn up the pump and change the 4 to a 5 and you got yourself a 50. Plays w_ 15 ft flex and 436 Hugger. Seems more suited for a 20 ft and 6 row. That's what the previous owner had on it. Would be nice to have those sizes, but I've got a few narrow clearances and don't want to mess with a head hauler. Have a good one.

  18. #17
    Deerebines
    Guest
    It's a pile of junk. Buy a Deere! *Grin* heh heh heh

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