Caterpillar Tobaboy how do you like the MAV chopperIJ

tobaboy

Guest
The MAV is amazing, its easily spreading the straw 36ft., its also chopping it to bits and doing a good job on the chaff. To get the chaff into the chopper it has an extension bolted onto the sieve with a rubber flap, this allows the chaff to move off the sieve and into the chopper, its a very simple design. The MAV will still allow you to spread chaff while dropping straw, I'm glad we went ahead and stuck it on, it should save a pass with the harrows. The winter wheat was only testing 17, but the straw was very tough. As for quality, well it remains a two after all the rain, but this last one sure bleached it out, rained again today...hopefully tomorrow we can get rolling, supposed to be sunny, I'll believe it when I see it!
 

big_rig

Guest
Same weather story here in northern mn, just cold and rain. The tracks might come in handy here. We still havn't started any wheat, but talking to a couple folks, and they mentioned installing a rubber flap between the back edge of the chaffer and seive. Have you ever heard of thisIJ thanks
 

big_rig

Guest
I am not sure, i assume to keep air from escaping between the gap, and force it up through the chaffer to get better air flow.
 

JoeSixPack

Guest
I read that in one of Ray Steukle's spIJ combine bibles. I think the idea of it is to hang the rubber flap across and underneth the chaffer just behind the sieve say two inches or so. Mabey down to the level of the sieve or a inch above, still giving room for material to shake off the sieve. (Make sure its attached would make a mess of the returns auger or elevator if it came loose) The idea is to make the air come up through the sieve and chaffer and not "bleed" between the two and up through the chaffer extension. If you try it lets us know how it worked, or not.
 

Old_Pokey

Guest
Sorry for the eves dropping, but I have a little info on the air dam you are talking about. Although I do run an IH, its still the same principle. If you're wheat is wet and heavy, and maybe even a bit sticky, without the air dam the blast of air upward is inconsistent. When you hit a low spot in the field or a weedier patch, or whatever causes a slightly different chaffer load, a larger percentage of air will be able to escape out the back. Its just the opposite of what you want to happen. As the air starts to escape rearward, it can also take with it more clean grain and make for inconsistent tailing load. Its at least worth a try. You should be amased at how much easier it will be to set the machine in adverse conditions. I will grant you that I dont harvest corn, but I have ran with and without the air dam in wheat and grass seed that has been rained on. Now if I have a problem setting the machine, I usually go to the air dam to make sure it is still in operating order. It takes out one more unneeded variable for setting the machine. Hope that helps. If you do try it would you please post again how it workedIJ
 

big_rig

Guest
Thanks for your imput, it might be worth a try. I will let you know how it works.
 
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